Dramatically increase wind farm output while protecting wildlife

Paper being prepared for peer review (updated 12 May 2018)

 

 

Wind farms in California and other regions of the world exist only in relatively small geographic regions. Most of these resource areas have reached their physical or political limits in their ability to install additional propeller-type, horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Nonetheless, many have topographies that create excellent near-ground wind speeds. To profit from the energetic wind below their HAWTs, wind farm owners need cost-effective vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) that operate efficiently in high turbulence and do so without wake shedding off the three-dimensionally spinning rotors negatively impacting their existing turbines. They also need turbines that are wildlife friendly. Turning the best near-ground wind into energy should eventually result in lower priced power than solar technologies or new wind farms, less habitat developed, and thousands of MWs of additional renewable power produced well after the sun sets

Design Evaluation - General Turbine Description for US

David Malcolm and Antonio Ojeda, Wind Harvest International, February 2017

 

This document contains a general description of Wind Harvest International's (WHI) Harvest production turbine to be installed and tested at the UL and West Texas A&M University's Advanced Wind Turbine Testing Facility near Canyon Texas. The basic operational and geometrical parameters of the turbine are given, together with information about the most important components and parts. In addition, the external conditions are defined.

Design Evaluation - Structural Design Methodology

David Malcolm and Antonio Ojeda, Wind Harvest International, February 2017

 

This document describes the methodology followed for the structural design of the Harvester WHI turbine v1.1 to be installed in Texas in 2017. It includes a description of the various computer models used in the design procedure and of the Design Load Cases selected for analysis. The purpose of this document is not to address detailed design values or detailed design parameters. For this, references are given to other documents.

Design Evaluation - Design for Fatigue

David Malcolm and Antonio Ojeda, Wind Harvest International, February 2017

 

This document describes the methodology used in the design of Wind Harvest International's Harvester turbine for fatigue loads. It presents in detail the results of the process for some of the critical components including the mast-to-shaft connection, the drive shaft, the blades, and the blade at the connection to the middle arm.

Design Evaluation - Design for Extreme Loads

David Malcolm and Antonio Ojeda, Wind Harvest International, February 2017

 

This document describes the methodology used in the design of the Harvester v1.1 turbine for extreme loads. It presents in detail the results of the process for some of the critical components including the mast-to-shaft connection, the drive shaft, the blade at the connection to the upper and middle arms, and the connection between the middle arm and the central mast. Results for the support structure are also presented.

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